Tag Archives: Barton System

She Thrived In School This Year

Homeschooling children with dyslexia can be a great option. But it’s nice to know that those children can be successful in a public or private school after they have had the right type of tutoring — as this parent shared: 

I homeschooled my daughter, who has dyslexia, while taking her through Levels 1 to 8 of the Barton Reading & Spelling System.

She is now 12 and just completed her first year of traditional school.

The Barton System prepared her well, and she thrived in school this year.

She was surprised to find out that she was better at reading aloud than some of her non-dyslexic peers.

We are so grateful to you not only for your program, but for the way you educate and encourage parents and students along the way.

Andrea Sivillo, homeschool parent
Fair Oaks, CA

Hayden Hated School

The right tutor, using the right program, can change everything — as this parent shared:

Hayden was not diagnosed with dyslexia until fifth grade.

Looking back, however, there were signs: family history, hours spent on homework that should have taken less than half the time to complete, trouble memorizing spelling words for the weekly test, not reading at grade level and the most obvious, but missed, was dysgraphia.

Hayden did not verbally communicate his struggles. He just said he hated school. His behavior at school was fine. In fact, the teachers loved him. Where we noticed problems were outbursts of anger and frustration at home and during sports.

So we decided to hit a reset button and pull him from all things not related to school.

We sent him to tutoring at Kumon, which only made things worse because he was sent home with lots more work to complete.

We also made him practice handwriting for a half an hour a day, which again,  only made things worse.

I had a friend who was certified to test for dyslexia and after talking with her and having him tested, she confirmed Hayden was dyslexic. She had a list of recommendations.

On the top of her list was getting Hayden into tutoring with the Barton Reading & Spelling System, and Kelly Christian was the tutor she recommended.

When we met with Kelly, she was not only super sweet and personable, but she really knew what we were struggling with.

Hayden began tutoring with Kelly two times a week in June 2016.  She made tutoring fun, and they developed a great relationship.  He did not fight going, and we started to see positive changes right away. His grades started to improve and so did his attitude.

Using the new techniques Kelly showed him, Hayden started reading again and was even able to understand why words are spelled the way they are and how to break them down into the smaller root word.

He completed the 10 level program in just under 3 years, in March 2019.

Hayden is a different student now. He understands what he’s learning and doesn’t hate school.

By showing him the reasons why, and the different tricks we dyslexics can use to learn and remember, Hayden is back at grade level and ready for high school.

Kari Carlson, parent
San Clemente, California

Stunned At Her Reading Ability

Susan Barton loves hearing from parents who take action right away, as this parent did:

My daughter had neuropsych testing done 3 1/2 years ago. She was diagnosed with dyslexia.

I researched and found a Barton tutor a month later.

We have worked tirelessly year round for the last 3 1/2 years. She is now in the middle of Level 8.

My daughter was recently retested by that neuropsych. The doc was STUNNED at her reading ability. He said it is very rare to see a child jump that drastically in their reading skills — and whatever I’m doing, keep it up!

Thank you, Susan, for creating the Barton System.

Kimberly Christianson
Homeschool Parent
Hampton, IA

Diagnosed at 14

It is never too late to close the gap, as this homeschool parent shared: 

We homeschooled our five children with ease — until we got to our fourth child. We knew Daniel was not learning like his siblings. By the time he was 8, his 6-year-old sister was reading circles around him.

When Daniel was 10, we sought professional help. But he was mistakenly identified as having an eye tracking disorder. The tracking exercises did nothing to improve his reading.

At 14, we finally had him tested by an educational psychologist who said Daniel was severely dyslexic, something we suspected, but did not comprehend. His reading score was at the 3rd grade level.

We immediately hired a tutor using the Barton System. Daniel made significant progress in a short time and grew in both his reading skills and his self-confidence.

At 16, he started his first college class and has since been dual enrolled, completing 30 college credits. With accommodations, including audio books and extended test time, he’s been very successful — averaging an A in the past 5 semesters of coursework!

At 17, he passed his written driver’s test at 85% without accommodations — a huge milestone for him!

We are so thankful for the Barton System, and we look forward to seeing his future accomplishments as he graduates high school and continues on to college.

Christine Torre
Homeschool Parent
Dawsonville, GA

He passed the state’s reading test

With the right type of instruction, even students caught late can succeed, as this parent shared: 

My son, Kyle, had trouble reading since kindergarten. He went through 5 years of elementary school staying at a kindergarten reading level. Teachers said he would not ever read, or that he would only be a sight reader.

Then one of his teachers, Emily Moss, got trained in the Barton Reading & Spelling System. She started tutoring him at the beginning of sixth grade. He just finished seventh grade, and his success is beyond words.

For the first time, he took the state standards test at the end of the year, and he passed the reading portion with a 3 — which means he met the standards. His teacher was so excited that she pulled him out of lunch to give him the news.

Imagine going from the kindergarten level to 7th grade level in just two years.

He’s able to read billboards, and he reads books by himself that he’s interested in. He’s never had that type of independence before.

I just want to thank you for the program. My hope is that all schools will have at least one teacher who has been trained in your program so they will be able to help another child like Kyle.

Tina Smith, parent
Reidsville, NC

Time to celebrate

This was posted on a homeschool Facebook page.  The parent gave me permission to share it here. 

I am celebrating tonight.

I have a child who was diagnosed as profoundly dyslexic at 9 years old. We went through 7 levels of the Barton System while I homeschooled him.

He is now in a college-prep, private high school. At the recent parent-teacher conference, his teacher was shocked to find out he is dyslexic. I did not tell the teachers in advance because I wanted to get a true measure of his capabilities.

He has excellent grades. The teacher said he even volunteers to read Macbeth aloud in class.

I almost cried! This is the same kid who made me ask our youth pastor to not call on him to read out loud … ever.

So stick with it, homeschool parents. It is so worth the years of hard work.

Allison Gentala, homeschool parent
Gilbert, AZ

Nothing Had Worked

Susan loves getting emails from parents, like this one:  

When I first contacted you, we had already tried Orton Gillingham, Lindamood-Bell, a private school for dyslexic students for 2 years, vision therapy, tutoring at a Score center, and the Sound Reading program. Nothing had worked.

Truly I was at a loss when I turned to you. Thank you for the Barton System. It is the ONLY program that worked for my son. He loves his Barton tutoring sessions, and he now feels confident, creative, and gifted.

Sky has finished Level 9 of the Barton System and is doing so well in school.

He did concurrent high school and college enrollment. After the first month, he stopped using all of his accommodations (textbooks on audio, recording of lectures, and extra time on tests). He got all A’s and B’s on his college assignments, and A’s on his final exams.

He just graduated high school, in 6 months he will complete his Auto Tech Certification, and then he will continue on for a college degree in Automotive Engineering and Design.

The Barton System is fabulous, concise, flows and builds on itself, and most importantly, it works.

Thank you for creating this system and being an advocate for dyslexia.

Meri Seibert, parent
Los Angeles, CA

Alex won an essay contest

When students finish Level 10 of the Barton System, there’s no stopping them, as this mother shared.  

While I was homeschooling, I took both of my sons through all 10 levels of the Barton System.

Asher, my older son, is finishing his first year in a traditional school as a Freshman, with straight A’s.  His teachers often express amazement at how little his dyslexia is hindering him.

Alex, my younger son, found out he won an essay contest with a $150 cash prize the same day he finished Level 10.

From a boy who struggled to write more than a few sentences 3 years ago to an essay winner!

Many thanks to you and the Barton System.

Maureen Becker, parent
Redwood City, CA

People do not understand

My son Kody completed all ten levels of the Barton Reading & Spelling System. He is now a Junior in high school. He recently wrote this paper for English class. I wanted to share it with you.  

Being 17 years old and having dyslexia may not seem like a big deal. But what I’ve had to do to this point in my life may be hard for others to comprehend. For most people, when they hear of someone that has a disability, they feel bad and look down on them.

People do not understand how hardworking, motivated and determined we are.

From the beginning of elementary school to third grade, I was always behind in school and not progressing like other students in my class, no matter how hard I had worked. I was then tested for dyslexia.

Being told I have a disability by my mother was really hard to accept in the beginning; however, it may have actually been one of the best parts of my life.

I finally had an explanation as to why I wasn’t doing as well in school. Teachers finally would stop saying that I “wasn’t trying” or that I just needed to put more effort into school.

I knew that having a disability was not going to cause me to give up. I knew that I would have to work twice as hard as everyone else.

I pushed myself throughout the rest of elementary school and through middle school, trying to get on the same level as my peers. I tried many things — such as doing different reading programs (some that had helped amazingly, the Barton Reading & Spelling System, and others that did not), working with my teachers one-on-one outside of school, and spending every night doing four to five hours of homework when other kids would get their homework done in class.

The one goal I wanted to achieve by high school was to avoid standing out from everyone else. Going into high school, I was finally on the same level as the other kids in my grade.

Having known and experienced just how hard it can be to have a disability, I have insights as to what other kids are most likely dealing with. It may be peers making fun of them, being told they can’t do something just because of their disability, or teachers not understanding how they learn best.

For me, the most stressful part of class was being terrified I was going to be called on to read out loud and then being judged by my peers.

When given a writing assignment, I would sit by myself, away from everyone, so no one would be able to see my writing and laugh at me.

Being someone with a disability, I know that there are always going to be people who will never understand the journey that I, along with many others, have faced; nor what I have done to get to where I am now. I hope that sharing my story will help others understand not only the negatives of having a disability, but also to see the opportunities that are possible.

Through all the struggles I’ve faced and experienced, I have always pushed through and thrived. The biggest advice I can give to someone with a disability is not to be ashamed of it or let it label you as “abnormal” (compared to whatever “normal” may be).

In my case, I would never say, “I’m a dyslexic.” I would say, “I am a person that has dyslexia.”

A disability is one part of who you are; it’s up to you to show the world how you want to be seen.

Koby Koblitz, Barton Graduate
Onalaska, WI

The Barton System helps children so much!

I love it when tutors get this excited about their students’ success.

My students have been in Barton for about a year. Their teachers are excited by the improvement in their reading and spelling.

But I love their new feelings of self-worth and confidence.

Teachers share that my students now participate in class discussions on a variety of topics — something they did not do before.

Parents share their kids are now reading bigger books at home.

That’s why I recommend the Barton System to my friends whose children struggle with reading and spelling.

Thanks so much for creating a way to give children their confidence back.

Rosalie Sweigart
Barton tutor at a small private school
Jayess, MS

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