Barton tutoring made all the difference for my son

If the early levels of the Barton System are hard for your child, stick with it.  This parent explains why.

Barton tutoring has made all the difference for my son. He had spent all of first grade working on 3 letter words, but he still could not consistently read them correctly.

He started Barton tutoring (three times per week) in second grade — very aware that he was just not able to learn reading and writing like the other children.

The beginning levels of Barton were very challenging for him. His tutor had to play lots of games mixed in with the lessons. He magically always seemed to win those games, which kept his self esteem high enough to keep working on the reading skills that were so difficult for him.

As he progressed, he realized this was a system of learning that made sense to him.

 

 

When he was in Level 5, he would finally read simple chapter books on his own. Somewhere between Levels 5 and 7, his fluency improved tremendously and he was reading at the speed of a typical student. Since then, his confidence has been growing steadily as he’s worked his way through the end of Level 10.

He is now 11 years old, and on his Stanford Achievement Test at the end of 5th grade, he tested as reading on a post high school level.

As a parent, I encourage other parents to make tutoring a priority, even when schedules are tight and there are other demands for our time and resources. I faced many days of my child complaining or having melt downs or stomach aches to avoid going to school or tutoring. In the end, I bribed him with screen time for every completed lesson and gifts for completing every level.

I also spent a lot of time educating teachers and advocating for accommodations to allow my son to do work orally, not read uncontrolled text in the early levels, not be taught to  read and write in Spanish, and to be allowed to type when other kids were handwriting.

In the end, it was all worth it — and I would do it over again in a heartbeat.

My son is happy and confident. Handwriting and spelling are still challenges, but he manages with typing and spellcheck.

The biggest difference is he is no longer held back by his dyslexia. He can now read and write at the level of his intelligence.

Susan, thank you a thousand times for all your dedication to kids with dyslexia.

Michelle Cudzinovic, parent
Sunnyvale, CA

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